The Skateroom

Henry Taylor Cicely and Miles Visit the Obamas Set of Skateboards

Regular price
$1,250.00
Sale price
$1,250.00
Regular price
| INC. VAT

Description

Available in a limited edition of 100, Cicely and Miles Visit the Obamas, captures a scene where Miles Davis and Cicely Tyson, stand in front of the White House. Describing the original work from 2017, Zadie Smith says ‘In this portrait, the Obamas are invisible, represented only by the house they’d just left, while the actress Cicely Tyson and her lover Miles Davis have been transported from a long-ago black-and-white society photograph onto the green impasto glory of the White House front lawn… Taylor thinks primarily in colors, shapes, and lines–he has a spatial, tonal genius. Form responds to form: the negative space around Cicely and Miles in the photograph suggests the exact proportions of the White House, yet in the transition the abstract sometimes becomes figured, and vice versa, as if the border between things didn’t matter.’

Details

  • Cicely and Miles Visit the Obamas, 2017
  • Limited edition of 100
  • Produced by The Skateroom in 2022
  • Set of 3 Skateboards, each deck measures approx. 80 x 20 cm
  • Made of ply Grade A Canadian Maple wood
  • Top-print includes the printed signature of Henry Taylor
  • 1 EasyFix wall mount included per deck
  • Certificate of Authenticity signed by The Skateroom

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Henry Taylor Cicely and Miles Visit the Obamas Set of Skateboards

Regular price
$1,250.00
Sale price
$1,250.00
Regular price
| INC. VAT
The Artist

Henry Taylor

Henry Taylor’s imprint on the American cultural landscape comes from his disruption of tradition. While people figure prominently in Taylor’s work, he rejects the label of portraitist. Taylor’s chosen subjects are only one piece of the larger cultural narrative that they represent: his paintings reveal the forces at play, both individualistic and societal, that come to bear on his subject. The end result is not a mere idealized image, but a complete narrative of a person and his history. Taylor explains this pursuit of representational truth: ‘It’s about respect, because I respect these people. It’s a two-dimensional surface, but they are really three-dimensional beings.’
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