The Skateroom

Henry Taylor The 4th Skateboard

Regular price
$450.00
Sale price
$450.00
Regular price
| INC. VAT

Description

The 4th is released in a limited edition size of 100. Based on a 2012 13-feet tall piece composed of two stacked panels. As Tatiana Istomina describes the work, ‘The upper [panel] shows the monumental form of a black woman in a white T-shirt; she holds what looks like a potato chip in one manicured hand and a barbecue fork in the other… Like many of Taylor’s best paintings, the work transcends the particular circumstances of the depicted event, transforming it into a metaphorical statement of epic proportions… Although her appearance is firmly rooted in the everyday life of contemporary America, the scale, posture, and gravity of the figure connects her to timeless icons of fertility and power, from Paleolithic Venus figurines to traditional African sculpture and early Renaissance Madonnas.’

Details

  • The 4th, 2012
  • Limited edition of 100
  • Produced by The Skateroom in 2022
  • Skate deck measures approx. 80 x 20 cm
  • Made of 7 ply Grade A Canadian Maple wood
  • Top-print includes the printed signature of Henry Taylor
  • 1 EasyFix wall mount included per deck
  • Certificate of Authenticity signed by The Skateroom

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Henry Taylor The 4th Skateboard

Regular price
$450.00
Sale price
$450.00
Regular price
| INC. VAT
The Artist

Henry Taylor

Henry Taylor’s imprint on the American cultural landscape comes from his disruption of tradition. While people figure prominently in Taylor’s work, he rejects the label of portraitist. Taylor’s chosen subjects are only one piece of the larger cultural narrative that they represent: his paintings reveal the forces at play, both individualistic and societal, that come to bear on his subject. The end result is not a mere idealized image, but a complete narrative of a person and his history. Taylor explains this pursuit of representational truth: ‘It’s about respect, because I respect these people. It’s a two-dimensional surface, but they are really three-dimensional beings.’
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